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Posted in Poetry

Freedom: An American Poem

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Turn your eyes up to the sky,
the sun shoots you a glint,
a light, a warmth, a tender smile,
from beams of perfect mint.

A gray that creeps and grows,
now reaches with its clutches,
its evil now it plants and sows,
and grabs all that it touches.

Its messages now blacken,
the lightening strikes the soul,
a crack, a thunder, morals slacken,
the attitudes are coal.

But the eagle now takes flight,
its wings woosh guiding light,
to We The People in the night,
who now will stand and fight!

By L. M. Montes

Posted in Poetry

You Are The Sun

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Your light it shines and warms the hearts
of family and friends who never part,
though unpredictable you be,
you sparkle through the clouds to me.

On days of gray and rain that spatters
warmth you give cause none of that matters,
however blurred your beams are splotched,
your radiance to my heart does touch.

Posted in Poetry

Fear

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A sound,
the dark,
a snake,
a remark,
that bites the brain
until you are bound.

You shrivel,
and cringe,
your breath,
does binge,
and stabs the heart,
now sanity is little.

a cry,
a shout,
the curtain
it lifts,
the light of truth,
and fear is a lie.

By L. M. Montes

Posted in Poetry

Go With It

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I woke today
to find a life
but found instead
I was almost dead.

What did I do?
Where did I go?
I dozed back to sleep
in bed you know.

Later, time it drug,
I had to hurry,
but I couldn’t scurry,
So I moved as though a slug.

I couldn’t fight this one bit,
therefore I concede,
to sit and read,
and alas just go with it.


By L. M. Montes

Posted in Writing

Metaphor

Definition: (from Dictionary.com) “A figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance”.

Examples:

  • His hand on my shoulder is a frigid icicle.
  • The house was hot furnace.
  • The sand is a blanket underneath me.
  • The wildflowers are a color wheel.
  • The stain was an annoying fly; always around and refusing to go away.

As you can tell by these examples, pictures are created within the readers mind that heightens their reading experience. They pull the reader into the story.

Posted in Fiction

Slow and Steady

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When it comes to writing fiction, take your time. Slow and steady. Easy does it. If you rush your story or go at a faster pace than what you’re comfortable with, everything else in your story will fall apart. There is so much that goes into a work of fiction that to speed through writing it for the sole purpose of getting it done will only slow you down in the long run. You don’t want to go back and redo something that you could have had right the first time had you just took your time. So…slow down.

Posted in Poetry

Response

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When a plant wilts,
do you feed it or let it die?
When the sun shines,
do you hide or in the sand lie?

In a moments time, when things can change,
do you shrink or life embrace?
When enemies use division’s knife,
Patriots rise and fight with grace.

By L. M. Montes

Posted in Writing

Metaphor and Simile

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Comparisons, we all make them whether we are aware of it or not. We do this for emphasis in making clear a point we’re trying to make. In writing we use comparisons for the same reason, but add to that, visuals. If we want our readers to know just how big something is, we need to go beyond using the word big or huge or even gargantuan. Readers want to SEE the hugeness. Two forms of comparison writers use to accomplish this is:

Simile–Comparing using the words like or as.

  • His mouth was thick like paste.
  • The cat’s eyes glowed in the dark like twin moons.
  • He smile was as bright as the sun.

Metaphor–A direct comparison.

  • The warm sand is a blanket.
  • The sound of his laughter was a dogs bark.
  • The moon is a lightbulb.

Posted in Writing

Writing Fun

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When I was in high school, I went to the Rueben Daniels Center of the Arts and Sciences. In my dance class we learned about theme and variation. What we had to do was choreograph a dance routine that was about one minute in length. Once we had our routine down, we had to choreograph two more dance routines based on the first one. More precisely, they had to be variations of the first by modifying it somehow without changing it completely. With writing this can also be done. Create a scene. Then, create two more scenes by varying the first scene. But, don’t vary things too drastically. It needs to be clear that your varied scenes are essentially the first scene but with slight differences.

What does this do? It works at developing creativity. It’s like a brain workout except its “bench pressing” words instead. So…have fun with it and think outside the box.