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Posted in Poetry

Seasons

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Winter ends—-
Spring will sing—-
Snow waves goodbye—-
Dew drops fall—-
Flowers awaken
From under their blankets.

Spring fades away—-
Summer has sprouted—-
All is warm and new—-
Lush green velvet grass—-
Lakes glisten turquoise blue—-
Show me such beauty
I know is true.

Summer gives way to fall—-
Leaves don their face—-
The cold lashes its tongue—-
Trees begin to shed their skin—-
How bare nature looks
When winter sinks its hooks.


Fall has disappeared—-
White has settled in—-
Snowmen stand in numbers—-
Birds are gone again—-
As nature spins its wheels,
God’s beauty slowly reveals.

By L. M. Montes

Posted in Poetry

Doll House

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Her life is like a doll house,
With everything in place,
A perfect house,
A perfect man,
And children filled with grace.

She talks not like a woman,
But rather as a child,
Playing games,
Skipping rope,
An innocence so mild.

But somewhere deep inside her,
She knows this isn’t like,
No hopes to hope,
No dreams to dream,
Just agony and strife.

One night she just walked out and left,
And made her life her own,
Reaching forth,
Grabbing hold,
You see how she has grown?

By L. M. Montes

Posted in Fiction

Writing That Stings

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What is it about a piece of writing that keeps you glued to the pages? Is it just one particular writing element that does the job, or is it more than one? I’m currently reading a mystery thriller series by Jeff Carson. It’s the David Wolf series. If you haven’t checked out these books, I highly recommend them. In less than a week I’ve finished the first five books and am on book six right now. What is it that keeps me reading them?

  1. Characters–The characters are unique and lifelike. Each of them have their own set of problems, likes/dislikes, habits and quirks, etc. You don’t end up liking or disliking them because you’re supposed to. You do that because these characters are very three dimensional. They jump off the page. They are real. You want to be ‘around’ them.
  2. Description–The setting is richly described and also jumps off the page. The reader is able to see the environment and be a part of the story. The author does this though without being too descriptive. It doesn’t take away from the story. If you read these books, you’ll find that the descriptions add to the story and provides clues.
  3. The Story–YES, the story itself is extremely compelling. You’re eyes/brain will be glued to the pages. The cause and effect of the plot structure is expertly done. Everything happens for a reason, whether you the reader thinks so or not.

So, you see, drawing a reader into your story is done with various tools, not just one. But, essentially, how you do that is up to you. After all, it’s your story.

Posted in Poetry

Sonnet I: Winter

Photo by Marlon Martinez on Pexels.com

When snow has come and lingered for a time,
The mountains shine like pure white satin sheets.
The jagged rocks that stand and point like knives,
Have but a look of poise and symmetry.
The houses they in hibernation go,
and sink like ships way deep beneath the waves.
Cold air does whoosh in frigid gusty blows,
But stops to peek a while inside a cave.
The birds take off from empty bare tree nests,
To seek their food which they know is not there.
The trees did fall asleep like all the rest
Of this great wintry beauty of no where.
The hunters coming back from years afar,
Do find their world still bright like heaven’s star.

Posted in Social

Appearance

Remember, not everything is what it appears to be. Just when you least expect it, the “curtain” can go up and things are then seen in the truest light.